A Day In The Life Of A Writer

 

Today I’ll share the glorious world of a fiction writer. On the days that I don’t have to worry about anything but writing, this is how it goes.

11AM is when I’ll wake up and brew of cup of Starbucks’ Blonde Willow Blend and I sit down to play Scarlet Blade. This will take up a couple hours as I let the cobwebs clear from my wind. After that it’s moving on to a shower. Once finished, I then start to work on writing projects.

As I mentioned before, I finished the first Talia novel and have now moved onto a new project. However, with that said, I learned a valuable lesson. A couple days ago there was a thread going over at the Writing Forums that was enough to make me shake my head. ‘How Many Words Do You Write In A Day.’ Listening to the figures, it was unsurprising to see how merde comes out of a lot of amateur writers. I’ve learned that things are simple:

If you slow down, you stand a better chance of writing good stuff.

Why? Because it gives you an opportunity to sit back and construct your sentences, paragraphs and chapters better. You, as the writer, can pay close attention of every word you put onto paper that way, which will, in turn, cut down on the sheer amount of editing necessary when finished with the rough draft.

I learned this as I ended up hard copy editing this novel two times. After practicing since ’08, this shouldn’t be something I need to do, so I plan to help prevent that by slowing down.

If there is any piece of advice I can give is to do what it takes to make sure you pay attention to every word, sentence, paragraph and chapter.

Sometimes the turtle gets the prize.

Ok, once I’ve written between 1-1.5k words, I call it a day. Yes, there are times that I feel I could go on forever, but is the quality there?

Now it’s dinner time, which is the one meal I really eat each day. If I have 2 it’s normally a weird move…and three is very rare. So, I’ll have anything ranging from pizza to Chinese and then settle down for the evening.

Reality television, outside of Wipeout, has no appeal to me, so I’ll crank up the BBC and see if any good dramas are on. If not, I’ll plug the ear buds into the laptop and watch anime for a couple hours.

I end the day playing Scarlet Blade until bedtime. There you have it, the day in the life of a writer. Glorious isn’t it?

Richard Matheson dead at 87

The author of “I am Legend” among other novels has left this world. May he rest in peace.

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(CNN) — Richard Matheson, a prolific American science fiction author and screenwriter whose stories were made into movies and TV episodes, has died. He was 87.

He died at his home in Los Angeles on Sunday, according to his son.

“As monumental as he is as a writer, he was every bit that as a husband, father, grandfather and friend,” Richard ChristianMatheson said on his Facebook page. “He was my hero and my best friend and I loved him deeply. I will miss him forever. I know we all will.”

During a career that spanned more than 60 years, the elder Matheson wrote more than 25 novels and nearly 100 short stories, plus screenplays for TV and film. Several of his novels were made into movies.

“I Am Legend,” released in 1954, inspired three films, including 2007’s movie of the same name that starred Will Smith.

His 1956 novel “The Shrinking Man” was adapted for the big screen, becoming “The Incredible Shrinking Man.”

Matheson was a major contributor to Rod Serling’s classic TV series “The Twilight Zone,” penning more than a dozen scripts from 1959 to 1964, including “Nightmare at 20,000 Feet.” He also wrote for “The Alfred Hitchcock Hour” and was the creative force behind the classic “Star Trek” episode “The Enemy Within.”

Matheson’s death comes as he was about to be honored by the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. He was to have received the organization’s Visionary Award at Wednesday’s annual Saturn Awards.

“Richard Matheson has been a singular voice in fiction, whose prolific written work is as unforgettable as the television and filmed entertainment it has inspired for more than half a century,” astatement on the academy’s website says.

Fellow writer John Shirley counted Matheson among the best at the craft.

“He was just so influential. He raised the bar for writing thrillers; he brought that high standard and sophistication to everything he did,” Shirley said on Facebook. “And his works … as books and movies, influenced me to have hope for meaning in life, and in the afterlife … he affected my point of view on life.”