Doctor Who’s Jenna-Louise Coleman quits role as Time Lord’s assistant and will leave at Christmas

tumblr_mto2stzKO41qzzh7so3_250

 

 

http://www.mirror.co.uk/tv/tv-news/doctor-whos-jenna-louise-coleman-quits-4061757

Advertisements

Heather Peace: ‘I want to be the first female Doctor Who’

By Karen FazackerleyBBC reporter

Heather Peace

 

The first woman to star in Doctor Who with a One Direction star as her companion? That’s the dream of actress and singer Heather Peace.

While the second part of that wish is pure fantasy, the ambition to become the Tardis’ first woman owner is a genuine aim and one she believes is realistic.

Best known for roles in Emmerdale, London’s Burning, Ultimate Force and BBC Three’s Lip Service, the 38-year-old, who currently plays teacher Nikki Boston in BBC One drama Waterloo Road, wants to add another iconic character to her CV.

Following the recent news that Peter Capaldi is to become the 12th Doctor, Peace genuinely hopes her time in the Tardis will come.

“I want to be the first female Doctor Who,” she says. “I’m just keeping it as a positive mental attitude.

“I think they should turn the whole thing around, I’ll be in my 40s soon and you need to be a bit older with a young male sidekick who is completely in love with her but she’s not interested.

“I’ve got it all figured out. It could be one of the One Direction boys. Time travelling is so for me.”

Peace grew up in Bradford, and says she knew which career path she wanted to take from a young age.

Heather PeacePeace studied drama in Manchester where she also held a jazz residency

Encouraged by her parents, she headed over the Pennines at 17 to study drama in Manchester before moving back when she won the role of Anne Cullen in Emmerdale.

Taking risks

Numerous theatre and TV credits followed, including The Chase, Blue Murder and Holby City, and Peace says she chose to play police officer Sam Murray in Lip Service over a part in a primetime soap opera.

“I had a job and it was between taking that on or taking Lip Service and I chose Lip Service,” she says. “That was a key turning point in my career.

“It was a shorter job than the one on the soap and it was a risk but I just thought, how would I feel if it was brilliant and I wasn’t in it and I was in the other job?

“If it was going to be brilliant I knew as a gay woman that if I turned it down I’d be mortified because I’d watch it.”

But do not think she is just there to tick another equality box, Peace has never hidden the fact she is openly gay, and admits at times it has been difficult and has shunned interviews when she was starting out in the industry to avoid the subject being brought up.

Continue reading the main story

“Start Quote

I didn’t do any personal interviews, but I was never in the closet”

Heather Peace

“I didn’t do any personal interviews, but I was never in the closet,” she says.

“I was out to my friends and family and everybody in the industry but I didn’t want to get in a taxi cab and the guy driving know, so I just didn’t talk about it.

“I was playing piano and singing and acting before I kissed a girl. People see it as something that defines you but straight doesn’t always define someone.

“But if someone is personally hideous to me I can literally have sleepless nights. People forget I am just a girl on the end of a phone, and quite often on my own, it’s devastating, and I can go into my own head sometimes.”

‘Times are changing’

Now a patron of Manchester Pride and Diversity Role Models, Peace, who entered into a civil partnership herself earlier this summer, believes times are changing.

“When I was 24 I was told not to come out, because I was there as a female in a man’s world, you can’t even believe that now. But things have changed so much and I have nothing to lose now.”

She has taken that philosophy into the next phase of her career and with two series of Waterloo Road under her belt and the new term just starting, Peace says the show will not shy away from tackling serious storylines.

“There’s a real depth to Nikki in this series,” she says. “She is not afraid to wipe the floor with someone.

“We see a lovely warmth between her and Kacey [actress Brogan Ellis] – a lovely relationship, a 17-year-old girl who needs to find an outlet for her anger and her issues with her gender disorientation, so that whole storyline is wonderful and Nikki becomes quite maternal.”

Heather PeaceHeather Peace toured sold-out venues in the UK and Australia in 2012

Her first passion, however, is music. Peace’s debut album Fairytales reached number seven in the Official Independent Chart last year and she embarked on a sell-out tour of the UK and Australia.

She is on the road again in October, splitting her time between touring the UK, being on set in Greenock, Scotland, for Waterloo Road, and her home on the south coast, before touring Australia in early 2014.

“I’m taking a break from the acting for a little while to go on tour and record my album in December. It doesn’t mean I’m leaving Waterloo Road, I’m just taking a tiny bit of time out.

“The songs are big tunes but with dark lyrics so my banter with my fans on the night is kind of the opposite to the lyrics of most of my songs – it’s going to be a rip-ride of a journey.

“This is my chance to really make it work and if it doesn’t and if I don’t get a hit album it’s not the end of the world. I just need to throw everything at this to give it my best shot possible.”

Doctor Who: Peter Capaldi will keep his Scottish accent

Glaswegian actor Peter Capaldi will retain his Scottish tones when he takes over the role of Doctor Who.

 

 

Fans of Malcolm Tucker’s Glaswegian burr will be pleased to hear that actor Peter Capaldi will be keeping his native accent when he becomes the 12th Doctor.

Doctor Who writer Steven Moffat revealed some hints about what viewers can expect from the new Time Lord to Doctor Who TV. Moffat said he was “pretty certain” Capaldi would keep his accent and would be an “older, trickier and fiercer Doctor”. As a guide, Moffat said fans can expect the 12th Doctor’s first few episodes to be similar to Tom Baker’s: “He’s really quite difficult to take at the beginning”.

Capaldi is known for playing spiky, difficult characters. As well as the foul-mouthed Malcolm Tucker in The Thick of It, he won acclaim for his portrayal of a damaged journalist in BBC Two’s The Hour last year.

‘Doctor Who’: ‘Luther’ creator Neil Cross writing for Peter Capaldi

From DigtalSpy.com   Story by Morgan Jeffrey

 

Luther creator Neil Cross has confirmed that he will return to Doctor Who for its eighth series.

Cross told Stuff.co.nz that he is “really excited about writing for Peter Capaldi” – the 55-year-old actor recently cast as the 12th Doctor.

Peter Capaldi arriving for the Orange British Academy Film Awards

© PA Images

Peter Capaldi

“I am going back [for series eight],” the writer revealed. “I have got story ideas tucked away… there’s a whole bunch of stuff I want to do.

“[Showrunner] Steven [Moffat] is clearly very busy with the 50th anniversary special and Christmas special, but I have to find out from Steven what his intentions for the Doctor are and what sort of stories he wants me to write.”

Cross – who previously wrote Who episodes ‘The Rings of Akhaten‘ and ‘Hide‘ – described Capaldi as “an outstanding choice” to replace current lead Matt Smith.

The Doctor (Matt Smith) & Clara (Jenna-Louise Coleman) in Doctor Who S07E02: 'The Rings of Akhaten'

© BBC

The Doctor & Clara in ‘The Rings of Akhaten’

“I am familiar with Peter Capaldi’s work and I am looking forward to it,” he said.

“There’s something about his physicality, his image, his wit, that evokes the Doctor. There’s something about him that evokes classic Doctor Who.”

Doctor Who‘s 50th special will air on Saturday, November 23, with Capaldi’s first full series to follow in 2014.

> Bill Nighy turned down Doctor Who: “It comes with too much baggage”

Watch Digital Spy‘s Geek TV special about Peter Capaldi and the 12th Doctor below

Read more: http://www.digitalspy.com/british-tv/s7/doctor-who/news/a507800/doctor-who-luther-creator-neil-cross-writing-for-peter-capaldi.html#ixzz2cSQb1sWd
Follow us: @digitalspy on Twitter | digitalspyuk on Facebook

Steven Moffat: Interview

guru.bafta.com

Steven Moffat

 

Words by Matthew Bell

This year’s Special Award recipient was never in any doubt about what he wanted to be when he grew up. As a child, he loved TV’s Doctor Who and devoured Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes books. He even wrote his own version of Robert Louis Stevenson’s novella Jekyll and Hyde.

“I never really had any other ambition and I was always very clear that I wanted to be a scriptwriter,” reveals Steven Moffat, who, of course, went on to write Doctor Whoand Jekyll, and create (with Mark Gatiss) Sherlock.

Moffat‘s big break in TV came in 1989 on ITV’s BAFTA-winning teen drama, Press Gang, for which he wrote all 43 episodes. More than two decades later, having penned hundreds of hours of drama, this most prolific of writers is now the showrunner (creative head) of the BBC’s two biggest dramas, Doctor Who and Sherlock.

Moffat’s early work mined his own experiences: a stint as a teacher for Press Gang and BBC1 school-based farce Chalk; and the ups and downs of his relationships in the BBC sitcoms Joking Apart and Coupling. Is it important to write about what you know? “I was a teacher once so I wrote about teaching; I was going through the terror and the triumph of dating so I wrote about that,” he replies.

“Every writer writes about what they’ve personally been through, just because that’s what’s to hand. I don’t know if it’s an important rule of thumb – you should tell the story that most animates you. But I think it’s important to not make a mistake like writing Chalk,” he adds.

“Chalk didn’t work, although there were some very good people involved,” Moffat recalls. The early signs were promising. “Of any sitcom I’ve ever witnessed being made, and I’ve seen loads of them like Men Behaving Badly and The Vicar of Dibley,Chalk had the biggest laughs on the night. As a piece of theatre it was brilliant in the studio – people came back every week; the audiences were rapturous. The trouble was when I watched the tape at home, it was far too loud and raucous [for TV],” he says.

“The second series was commissioned before the first went out and they didn’t have time to cancel it. There’s no feeling on earth like working on a show that you know is doomed and already tanking.”

 

“I’ve always been much more passionate about television than movies and I don’t particularly want to be a foreigner. I‘d rather work here – working in British television is pretty cool.”

 

 

Writing comedy is a tricky business. Coupling, which followed Chalk, was a hit with both critics and viewers. Yet while making it, Moffat had a few shaky moments. “When we filmed the best ever show we did for Coupling – half of which was in Hebrew – the audience kept leaving on the night; I was barely getting laughs at all,” he recalls. “We moved the episode later in the run because we assumed that it was terrible, but when it came out it was the show that put us on the map.”

When Coupling ended after four series, Moffat jumped genres, writing episodes for the regenerated Doctor Who, including ‘Blink,’ which won him a BAFTA in 2008, and a modern-day version of Jekyll for BBC1.

“After many years of doing comedy, and rather farce-based comedy at that, it looks like a leap, but it didn’t particularly feel like one,” he recalls. “People talk grandly about range, but the truth is that you’re just writing.”

As a writer, Moffat prefers the end result to the process: “I love having written and getting a good show out there. I think it would be overstating things a little to say I love the actual writing.”

His advice to would-be scriptwriters is “just write. The big break is easy if you’re good enough. I hear people saying, ‘I’m desperate to write – I’ve written this script.’ And I want to say: ‘Why haven’t you written 50 scripts?’

“The first 50 will be shit and so will the next 50 and probably the 50 after that,” he continues. “You have to write all the time and not worry so much about going to the right parties or the contacts you have in the business – they’re completely irrelevant. And stop badgering people for advice because there almost is none – If you write a truly brilliant script, it will get on the telly.”

Doctor Who returns this autumn and Sherlock next year, and Moffat has no plans to move on. “The moment it’s time to stop on a show is not an ambiguous feeling – you just suddenly think, ‘I can’t do it anymore; I’ve had enough’,” he says.

Moffat has dipped into Hollywood, co-writing the screenplay for Steven Spielberg’sThe Adventures of Tintin: “I left it early and handed over to Edgar [Wright] and Joe [Cornish] – I ran away from LA to Cardiff to do Doctor Who, which is an unusual career path.”

“I’ve always been much more passionate about television than movies and I don’t particularly want to be a foreigner. I‘d rather work here – working in British television is pretty cool.”

And, rarely has there been a better time to work in TV. “It’s extraordinary,” says Moffat. “Our drama is doing phenomenal business everywhere and look at the amount of bloody brilliant comedy we’ve got at the moment. This is a golden period.”

Peter Capaldi The Oddsmakers Favorite To Replace Matt Smith

BBC

 

Peter Capaldi remains the bookies’ favourite to be named the next Doctor Who on Sunday.

Capaldi, 55, who is better known for playing hot-headed Malcolm Tucker in The Thick of It, has been placed above Daniel Rigby, Ben Daniels and Rory Kinnear to play the next Doctor.

Click here to see the other favourite actors in-line to be the new Doctor

William Hills has 11/8 odds on Capaldi, making him the favourite to be handed the role, although Black Mirror actor Daniel Rigby has made a late entry into the top five seeing his odds slashed from 40/1 to 9/2.

Joe Crilly, a spokesman for William Hill, said: “Peter Capaldi remains the favourite as we await the announcement, but it does not appear that the result is as cut and dry as first thought with Daniel Rigby coming in for some late support.”

The unveiling of the 12th Doctor will be announced on Sunday during a special live showon BBC One, which will see the next incarnation of Doctor Who emerge from the TARDIS.

It is thought that Capaldi’s name began to surface after Doctor Who creator Steven Moffat said he would not rule out casting an older Doctor.

He said: “We’ve never not considered an older Doctor. It is completely on all the lists we make- there are absolutely older Doctors.”

Previous frontrunner Rory Kinnear has slipped to fourth place at the bookies after he revealed he had never seen an episode of the show.

Billie Piper, former Doctor’s assistant Rose Tyler, is the only woman listed by Paddy Power to take on the title role after it was rumoured earlier this week that an actress might be in the running.

But with odds on at 33/1 it doesn’t look like Piper will be emerging from the TARDIS on Sunday.

Odds to replace Matt Smith as the Doctor

Peter Capaldi: 11/8

Daniel Rigby: 9/2

Ben Daniels: 5/1

Rory Kinnear: 15/1

Andrew Scot 10/1